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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 407 (some duplicates have been removed)
is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a
is playing the science guy. i don't think you're ever coming back, lawrence. >> reporter: no. this is a lot of fun. a lot of kids can come down here and make some really interesting neat stuff. it's all part of a neat science festival they have at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to check it out. they have all kinds of things. this is what they are going to be using to launch some of those planes right here in the lobby and around the tech museum. they have exhibits, imax, real scientists that you can come down and meet and ask them very important questions too. the silicon valley really the center of what has been major innovations that really changed the world. you can come down and meet some of the scientists who have helped to make some of the changes. of course, the weather looking nice now. we are talking about some sunshine coming our way. we're going to need it this morning. it's chilly in spots, low 40s in the north bay valleys, 50s elsewhere, partly cloudy skies. we have a couple of patches of fog and high clouds likely to drift across our skies for today so
an answer or maybe not oh easy answer. this is not just something that is science fiction. we have to deal with it. anything that anybody has mentioned. >> we keep hearing everybody talk about it. we're going to come back and learn from this and build something stronger arrested better. you hear the politicians say that now after this situation that we've had. i have not heard one specific thing like this is what we're going to do. this is how much it's going to cost. homeland security secretary quoteds a saying, this could be the most expensive recovery in history. hurricane katrina cost $106 billion. that's how much it cost to recover from that hurricane. this is going to surpass that. people are going to be thinking what can we do better so we don't have these horrible situations happen, and spending all this money that america will have to spend to recover from it it. >> eliot: the ex-spans and swath from new jersey, pennsylvania upwards, the devastation is huge. the economic toll, the cost of human life enormous, and awful to see. brandi hitt, thank you for joining us tonight. >> eli
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> hello, everybody. i'm melisilissa rehberger. wall street will be back in business tomorrow. they will reopen wednesday after hurricane sandy shut down trading for two days. the organizers of the new york city marathon say they are going ahead with sunday's race despite the damage caused by sandy. meanwhile, ubs announced it will cut up to 10,000 jobs by 2015. they say they're tryin
that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news and there's enough bad news in the world and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests, those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such a potential disaster, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don't have any high ground to go to in this where we have 6 bill
. something i deal with as a science reporter is the fear of discussing the nuance in this science conversation because i'm afraid when i talk about how this is a really nuanced problem, it adds fuel to them saying it happened years ago. all of a sudden the climate deniers say this can't possibly be global warming. >> they use the advantage of science, which is we're not certain about everything. we do experimentation and give you a parameter within which things can happen, an explanation, and we have hypothesis theories, and they go aha you don't know. i know because god told me. god turns out to be the koch brothers right? >> i'm loving all of the tweets, you know sandy is god's way of... i actually sent out a tweet last night it's not god's way of anything. nature has no agenda here. >> we're used to that. these big storms have always been accompanied by those who want to attribute it to a divine course. that's absurd on its face. i don't know what to say to that. >> thank you guys, actually come back and stay with us and we'll have more discussions about the ramifications later
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> governor christie throughout this process has been responsive. he's been aggressive in making sure that the state got out in front of this incredible storm. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and the people of our state. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie standing together side by side surveying the damage from hurricane sandy. they have gone from adversaries to praising each other. my guest michael moore. we did cover the rockaway blaze in the midnight show on monday night in to tuesday morning. i was anchoring that toward the end. we were one of the first networks to get it on the air. >> but two or three hours after it happened. my point is, can you imagine if 110 homes were burning right now in los angeles? >> sure. >> it would be another three hours we heard about it. >> no. but you have to take it in the context of everything else going on in new york. >> my point is that everything going on wa
tonight 10:00 p.m. eastern. but first more "viewpoint" coming right up. politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: we've heard all the promises excuse, smart lines and grotesque misrepresentations. now it's time to choose. the choice is easy. on one hand you have the leader who saved us from sure fiscal di it waster, watched over a recuperating economy preserved our national security and guided our nation's international relations in rough waters insured landmark universal access to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be m
and the budget crisis here at s-j-s-u is dr. charles bullock ... the dean of the college of applied sciences and arts. thanks for joining us .... so dr. bullock, as an educator what stance are you telling your teachers to take in terms of prop 30? what is this school facing if prop 30 doesnt pass? what should students be prepared for or be doing to plan for next semester? can you guarantee that students who are planning to graduate next semester will be able to get the classes that they need? do you remain optimistic about the future of higher education in california and why? thanks for joining us dr.bullock the u-s census bureau says latinos make up one of six residents in the united states. so with the election day less then two weeks away... will the latino vote have an impact (?) update news' pedro garcia shows us the last minute push to register latinos to vote. ">>>on the corner of story and king in east san jose...a group that advocates for immigrant rights...siren attempted to get latinos registered to vote. jeremy barousse/ siren "we are out here registering voters. it's the last da
for it. -- to work for it. [applause] we should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
help doctors pinpoint those with the highest risk. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> current options includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto based cardio dx. it involves a blood draw that can be do
of man-made global warming is a hoax. >> the science is bad. >> unproven science. >> that has yet to be proven and i highly doubt it's going to happen any time soon. >> still a scientific theory that has not been proven. >> cenk: that's the media. that's the republicans. when you turn to the democrats i wish i had good news for you. but president obama hasn't been that much better in his results. now he was recently on mtv kind of like candy crowly, he views it as a niche-type-of-topic. >> obama: we're not moving as fast as we need to. this is an issue that further generations, mtv viewers are going to have to be dealing with, even more than the older generation. this is a critical issue. there is a huge contrast in this campaign between myself and governor romney. i'm surprised it didn't come up in one of the debates. >> cenk: here's how it could have come up, if you brought it up. did you notice, you mtv viewers i guess you care about this because you'll be around when things get really bad. although things are getting bad now. and he said he has a much different record than mit
have climate problem. and majority of americans believe in science. we have allowed the ignore ray mouses run the show on this and this should put an end to that. >> could it be that they have been measuring weather since 1898, could it be a global cyclical weather thing, actually not global warming but something that may have happened 500, 1,000 years ago you get pockets of this and we don't have the records to back it up. could it be that. >> i will answer it the way mayor bloomberg answered it, it could be that but do you want to take a risk? what if you are wrong? we are not prepared like we weren't prepared for this and we won't be prepared for the next thing and we weren't prepare fdr the drought this summer. how many times do we get punched in the face before we realize, something is punch me in the face. >> chad, you have been in the game nearly three decades, is this global warming we are seeing from a meteorological point of view, is there any other explanation. >> it's the prime suspect. i don't have one. maybe particulates in the air. the rain drops, the moisture can ge
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
. no science about the workout, no science about breathing. they're just saying it's anti-christian. let me tell you something in my opinion it is a constitutionally unhinged argument. there is no basis. you know what, i spent time in federal court getting restraining orders under the first amendment. let them take it into federal court. the federal judge is not going to grant a restraining order. it is not anti-christian, it is not prose la tizing. it is absolutely proper for these 5500 kids to be exposed to this physical workout. >> richard, why now after three years and like a half million dollar grant to keep this program going? >> yeah. i respectfully disagree with my dear friend, avery, on this one. whenever you're using public funds in public schools, you cannot, you cannot force children to take any sort of religious activity. and be in this particular case -- >> isn't that -- is this a religious activity or is this exercise? >> the allegation. >> thank you. that's the point. >> in the course of the exercising, what they are teaching is eastern hinduism. the poses are out of respect
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
science to get in the way of politics but the obama administration hasn't been out front on the issue either. we will talk mother nature's revenge when chris hayes joins us just ahead. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop t
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ >> read my lips. ♪ >> jennifer: you are back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. if you feel like there has been a lot more presidential campaign tv commercials this year than there was in 2008, you would be right. four years ago, about 637,000 adsed a aired at this point in the race. this year, that number has sky rock setted to 915,000 commercials, a 44% increase. unbelievable. enough to make you long for the days when political tv ads were a novelty. well, tonight in part two of our eight-part series the selling of the presidents. barry lank takes us back to when it all began. >> it was 1952 television was the big new thing. >> eisenhower answers america. >> dwight eisenhower's team lead the way to bring the candidate right into america's living rooms. >> help me put the lid on crazy government spending. >> the ads were very effective. they made more than 40 eisenhower america spots. >> the camera in eisenhower was l
in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. what we know isboron is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of the republican par
change and casting doubt on the science of climate change cost him dearly today. new york's independent mayor mike bloomberg endorsed president obama referring both to hurricane irene last august and sandy this week. bloomberg wrote and i quote "in just 14 months, two hurricanes have forced us to evacuate nakeds, something our city had -- never done before. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." for more, we have on the phone -- what's going on to get to millions of commuters to work tomorrow, i'm joined by phone by metropolitan transportation spokesman aaron donovan. thanks for joining us. >> thanks, governor, you bet. >> eliot: we know you've begun to get some of the subways above 34th and 42nd street moving again. what will be open tomorrow and then if you could, give us an update on the tunnels which seem to be the major impediment to expanding traffic. >> well, at this point in time, our subway system is essentially cut in half. we have some service
screens. i was down at the tech museum of innovation today and they are having a science festival so we were doing the whole flew tog thing. that wasn't too bad. you can make your own down there and learn all about the arts and crafts down there making innovative new things. if it doesn't work, there are crashes like mine, just build it again. around the bay area today, we are looking at some sunshine and a few high clouds outside. the temperatures right now not too bad. 62 degrees in concord. 60 in livermore. 61 san francisco. and 61 degrees in san jose. as you head towards san jose, still hazy outside. it's taken a while for low clouds and fog to break up. we are still going to see clouds into the afternoon but motors of that will be high clouds. temperatures cooler at the coast with mild temperatures inland tonight low clouds and fog likely to make a return but what a weekend we have coming our way. cold front trying to move in before the ridge can build in so we are going to see a few high clouds this afternoon and that's it. then this ridge kicks into gear building this for the wee
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 407 (some duplicates have been removed)